Category Archives: Workout of the Day

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Workout: “Helton”

Three rounds for time of:

800m Run

30 Dumbbell Squat Cleans (45, 30)

30 Burpees

image1 (5)

Become A Student In Your Own Sport

~ The Glassman Chipper ~

When a pegboard showed up in Event-12 of the 2015 Reebok CrossFit Games, a lot of people were shocked (and oddly offended). That’s a weird reaction by any follower of a sport in which competitors sign up to face the “unknown and unknowable,” but it’s even weirder when you consider CrossFit’s Founder and CEO wrote about pegboards back in 2002.

In the second issue of the CrossFit Journal, Greg Glassman listed and sourced all the equipment a person would need to turn a garage into a “world-class strength and conditioning facility.” The article, “The Garage Gym,” has been sitting in the CrossFit archives since September 2002, and it’s the third-most-popular of the nearly 4,000 pieces of content. Only the “Level 1 Training Guide” and “What Is Fitness?” outrank it.

And what of the recent announcement regarding the strict muscle-ups at regionals? Glassman didn’t mention kipping once in his “The Muscle-Up” article in 2002. He was clearly detailing the strict movement. All this is to say the CrossFit Journal archives are rich with knowledge, but a lot of people are missing out on it.

From a historical perspective, Glassman’s early articles signaled a new era of fitness, just the way the first Nautilus machines changed the fitness industry in the early ’70s, though many would rightfully contend those machines were a step in the wrong direction.  Glassman wrote about topics all but banished by traditional fitness publications. By shedding new light on the disciplines of gymnastics, kettlebell-work, powerlifting, olympic lifting and more—all combined in a constantly varied format—Glassman bent the fitness industry away from selectorized machines and aerobics one Journal article at a time. Beyond that, Glassman’s articles have stood up to scrutiny over the years: They contain the first true definition of fitness, they explain exactly why and how the CrossFit program works, and they detail everything you need to know in order to become very fit. Taken together, they’re like finding the formula for gunpowder.

So, without further ad0, your next workout is a chipper for time… solely bent on challenging your mind. Glassman did, after all, say “The greatest adaptation to CrossFit takes place between the ears.” Below is a collection of Glassman’s earliest CrossFit Journal writings from April 2002 to March 2004—38 articles published over two years. Your challenge is to read or reread them all in order.

Attention spans are short, and it’s far easier to get click-baited into a rabbit hole of top 10’s and celebrity gossip, with ample distractions provided by text messages, facebook notifications and snapchats. Some will definitely ask “why bother…” before hitting Instagram to double-tap hearts onto an ocean of slow-motion snatch videos.

“Foundations,” published April 2002.

“The Garage Gym,” published September 2002.

“What Is Fitness?” published October 2002.

“Strategies for a 7 Minute 2K on the Concept II Rower,” published November 2002.

“The Muscle-Up,” published November 2002.

“Glycemic Index,” published November 2002.

“Squat Clinic,” published December 2002.

“Ergometer Scores and Hall of Fame Workouts,” published December 2002.

“Fast Food,” published December 2002.

“A Postural Error—A Costly Biomechanical Fault: Muted Hip Function (MHF),” published January 2003.

“The Overhead Lifts,” published January 2003.

“Interview: Coach Greg Glassman,” published January 2003.

“The Odd Lifts,” published January 2003.

“Hooverball,” published February 2003.

“Theoretical Template for CrossFit’s Programming,” published February 2003.

“Seniors and Kids,” published February 2003.

“The Push-Up,” published March 2003.

“Police Training,” published March 2003.

“A Better Warm-Up,” published April 2003.

“How Fit Are You?” published April 2003.

“The Pull-Up,” published April 2003.

“Two Training Aids,” published May 2003.

“Three Important Ab Exercises,” published May 2003.

“Beginners’ Workout,” published May 2003.

“Metabolic Conditioning Glossary,” published June 2003.

“Interval Generator,” published June 2003.

“Metabolic Conditioning,” published June 2003.

“The Clean,” published July 2003.

“Anatomy and Physiology for Jocks,” published August 2003.

“The Deadlift,” published August 2003.

“Functionality and Wall Ball,” published August 2003.

“Benchmark Workouts,” published September 2003.

“Really Cool Homemade Parallettes,” published September 2003.

“Team Workouts,” published October 2003.

“Nutrition: Avoiding Metabolic Derangement,” published November 2003.

“Handstands,” published January 2004.

“Macroclimbing,” published February 2004.

“What Is CrossFit?” published March 2004.

Posted in | Leave a comment

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Workout: “Isabel”

30 Power Snatches For Time (135, 95)

Accessory: Accumulate 3 minute GHD Superman Hold

parkwod2

Adult P.E.

Who needs barbells when you have the great outdoors!

Don’t forget, this Saturday will likely be our last park workout, as we will soon transition to our summer season ‘track’ workouts on Saturday mornings (when the gym is closed).  Stay tuned for upcoming dates.

Posted in | Leave a comment

Monday, May 23, 2016

Workout: Back Squat: 5-5-5-5-5

Accessory: 3×12 Back Rack Barbell Step-Ups

image1 (4)

Summer-Bod Post-Wod

Coach Joe, working on his suntan after a heaping helping of 135lb lunchtime thrusters last Friday afternoon.

Posted in | Leave a comment

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Workout: Power Snatch: 1-1-1-1-1-1-1

Accessory: 100 Banded Good Mornings

pete

This Just In: Improving Technique Improves Fitness!

Athletes often form a false assumption between proper form and intensity, assuming that as one increases the other must necessarily decrease.  This idea is a thinly disguised excuse for athletic complacency. Rather than revisit proper technique through lowering one’s intensity, low-excitement skill work, the athlete chooses to pursue personal records with diminished form. The reason: it’s easier on the ego to put up good workout times. Taking a hit to your “Fran” time in order to perform near-perfect thrusters is not going to move you up the records board — at least not right away — and the blow to the ego is usually too much to bear.

In reality, technique and intensity are not mutually exclusive. For the novice, maintaining proper form becomes a cruel joke as intensity increases, leading to the erroneous conclusion that the two cannot coexist.   Advanced athletes believe the opposite.  These athletes recognize that continuous high-intensity work is nearly impossible without strict attention to form.  The advanced athlete knows that proper  form is proper for a reason:  it imparts structural advantages that poor form does not.

Squatting provides a wonderful illustration. The squat utilizes power from the hip to propel the torso through a complete range of motion.  If the spine is rounded and the torso is loose, power is lost and the torso becomes difficult to move.  If the spine is kept in a neutral or arched alignment and the torso is rigid, as proper form dictates, power flows freely and the load is easy to move.  Nonetheless, we’ll often see new athletes blasting through limp, rounded-back squats, completely unaware of the power-draining effect of their substandard form.

Condoning bad form for the resulting intensity ignores the bigger picture.  In doing so, we rob our athletes of their long-term potential, artificially capping their progress in the name of immediate gratification.  An athlete with poor form and an ugly 3-minute “Fran” will always have an ugly 3-minute “Fran”, while a similar athlete with good form will soon find himself pushing the limits of possibility, thus improving their time(s)… over time.

Don’t believe us? Have you seen Pete C, lately!?! He’s strong as an ox (shown in the photo above). Pete has slowly and consistently continued to make gains each and every day, and it shows! His only rule: To lift only what proper technique will allow, regardless of his overall ‘strength’.  In doing so, Pete has come further in one year than most athletes will in six years — and all without having overloaded his joints or by piling on tons of extra ‘work’.

Well done, Pete. Well done.

Photo credit: Lincoln Brigham

Read more here.

Posted in | Leave a comment

Friday, May 20, 2016

Workout: Five rounds for time of:

15 Thrusters (135, 95)

Run 400m

scott

Focus Is Key

A huge congratulations to Scott Mc for PR’ing every one of his deadlift sets on Wednesday ~ his head-game was strong, including a small tweak that was made to how he addressed the bar in the setup position. This combination was enough to land Scott a 370lb liftoff on his last heavy single — a 25lb PR that looked nearly effortless as he stood it up.

Posted in | Leave a comment

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Workout: 7 rounds for time of:

10 Pull-Ups

10 Dips

10 Sit-Ups

10 Squats

Time Cap: 22 minutes

nate

Nate The Almighty!

Congratulations to Nate for PR’ing his clean and jerk in Oly class last Thursday evening — a whopping 255lbs! He was so excited after the lift, he decided to pick up the bar again — this time using only two fingers.

Photo Credit: Lincoln Brigham

Posted in | Leave a comment

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Workout: Deadlift: 1-10-1-10-1-10

Accessory: 10×2 Seated Box Jumps

duncan

Do You Even Levitate, Bro?

Photo credit: Lincoln Brigham

Posted in | Leave a comment

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Workout: Push Press: 3-3-3-3-3

Accessory: 3×20 Dumbbell Rollbacks

Then —

100 Banded Tricep Extensions

grayson

Squat Like You Give A Damn!

The ability to successfully perform a deep squat is a fairly good indicator of one’s overall fitness level and movement quality. Is it the end all, be all? Absolutely not, but it ranks right up there.

Squatting, for all practical purposes, is a complex movement that requires stability of the trunk and mobility of the extremities through constantly changing tension and position.

What limits squat depth? Stiff ankles, poor hip mobility and poor core stability just to name a few. Moreover, the ability to perform a picture perfect (deep) squat pattern demonstrates that someone has proper ankle dorsiflexion, hip flexion, thoracic extension, and glute activation, which can help counteract or “undo” much of the musculoskeletal issues we see in every day society: low back pain, anterior knee pain, hip pain, hamstring strains, and groin strains, to name a few.

Photo: Grayson C., squat cleaning 198lbs during her training last Friday in Open Gym.

Posted in | Leave a comment

Monday, May 16, 2016

Workout: For time:

20 Front squat, (185, 135)

40 Toes to bar

60 Kettlebell swings, (72, 55)

Accessory: Accumulate 3-minute banded plank

image1 (3)

Strength Is Not ‘Contractile Potential’

Strength is, by definition, the productive application of force. Shown above, Lucas O. productively split jerked 200lbs last Thursday (he weighs 140lbs…).

Photo credit: Lincoln Brigham

Posted in | Leave a comment

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Workout: Complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of:

200m Run

10 Push-Ups

15 Air Squats

Accessory: Accumulate 50 Butterfly Abmat Sit-Ups

dais

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect!

A huge congrats to the nine lifters who PR’d their snatch in Coach Lincoln’s Olympic Lifting class this past Thursday night.

Shown above, Daisy May stands up 112#’s with a well-deserved smile.

Photo credit: Lincoln B.

Posted in | Leave a comment

Like Us on Facebook!